How to deal with P.M.S.

It’s that time of the month again, a week before your period. You’re tired, moody, and are craving all sorts of junk food. You’re suffering. How can you find relief?

What happens during P.M.S.? After we ovulate our estrogen and progesterone declines along with our serotonin, or “feel good” hormone. So what can you do?

  • Exercise, get those serotonin levels up. Exercise boost your mood as well. This may be the last thing you want to do. It takes some self discipline. You will feel better afterwards.

Canva - Woman Exercising

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Try to eat healthy, even though you are craving junk food. Eat food rich in phytoestrogens, such as:

  • vegetables
  • fruit
  • some grains
  • legumes

Or try a plant based diet, with nuts. Phytoestrogens naturally occur in plants.

Vegetables mix on wooden table

Get a good nights rest. So that your symptoms aren’t worse. PMS makes it difficult to sleep because of the hormone fluctuations, this is always why exercise is important during PMS to help you sleep.

Woman sleeping

Self care: You may feel anxious. My anxiety acts up during PMS. You need to find a way to relax. Get a massage, acupuncture, chiropractor. Try yoga, meditations, and stretching. Do not try to do take on too much, this is the time of the month to relax. Take a hot bath. Use some lavender essential oil.

Canva - Woman Doing Yoga

 

I hope these tips help you get through this dreaded time of the month. It has gotten worse for me as I’ve gotten older.

Here is an informative YouTube video  that demonstrates all stages we go through each month.

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My experience with the Paragard IUD, and story about having part of it stuck in me for life.

This post isn’t intended to scare anyone away from IUD’s. After 10 years of having the paragard IUD, I got another one inserted, and still recommend it, because for 10+ years, it has done what it is intended to do, which is prevent pregnancy!

I couldn’t imagine having another baby with a preteen, and a teenager, working my difficult job as a caregiver, and trying to support my two children, and then buying my kids their first car and paying for College while having a toddler or preschooler.

Last year I went to get my IUD taken out because I have had it for 10 years already. Paragard IUD’s are good for 10-12 years. I didn’t want to take any chances. When the midwife pulled out my IUD slowly, it hurt so badly. I mean so much pain that I felt like I was going to pass out. When she showed it to me, the arm of the IUD was missing. She got the OBGYN and did an ultrasound, and they couldn’t find it.

My OBGYN said this is very rare for this to happen, so I am one of the lucky ones. I still don’t want anyone to worry about this happening because I have another IUD, and it probably will not happen this time. If it does, it is still not that bad. Remember you are supposed to go back one month after insertion to make sure it is in the correct spot. I also use spermicide since the arm of the IUD broke off before, and we do not want anymore babies.

They sent me down to X-ray, and did another ultrasound. They saw something in my pelvis, but that is all the X-ray said. They couldn’t really pin point where it was so they wanted to do a hysteroscopy, where the doctor puts a camera in the uterus. This is considered a minor surgery.

I went to the hysteroscopy, and they gave me two pain pills. I was so out of it and weak I couldn’t walk. I was talking the nurses ear off, about nothing really, poor nurse. Then they gave me a shot in my cervix and I had ringing in my ears. They put oxygen on me as well. Then I felt better after only 10 seconds. They put the camera in my uterus to find the IUD but did not find it. So after she could not find it, she inserted another Paragard IUD.

After the surgery I felt weak, drowsy, and out of it, but only for an hour. The next day it wasn’t too painful at all. I just popped an Ibuprofen. This procedure was easy, and painless. The only thing that bothered me was the pain pills and their side effects.

So to recap I don’t know if the IUD was in place before my midwife took it out, and as she was pulling it out it if it broke off then or beforehand? I don’t know if it is embedded in my uterus or not. It could of broke off years ago and was still effective.

So what is the paragard IUD, and how does it work? The paragard IUD is a T-shapped  copper coil that is inserted into the uterus, the copper acts like spermicide, and is toxic to sperm. It is more than 99% effective, no birth control is 100%. It is almost effective as sterilization.

It is non hormonal and makes your periods heavier, and more cramping. My periods are just heavier, I do not have bad cramps. I choose paragard, because I hate hormonal birth control. I’ve tried it all, the pills, the depo, hormonal IUD’s, nuvaring, and Nexplanon that goes in your arm.

Hormonal birth control makes me gain weight, depressed, anxious and moody. With paragard I feel overall pretty normal. No weight gain, and stable emotionally. Some people claim that paragard gives people copper toxicity, but I don’t know if there is enough copper. The medical doctor says there is not enough, but I am not so sure about this. I do have anxiety and depression, but it is managed.

So there you have it, I have an arm of an IUD stuck inside of me somewhere, for the rest of my life. I have pictures of it if you dare look. I also have the X-ray report.

Disclosure: Always seek medical advice from a licensed professional. These are merly my opinions but cannot in no way replace the advice of an doctor, or anyone else as a medical profession.

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The rest of it is somewhere in my body. It is supposed to be a T-shape.

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