How reading to your child is beneficial, and prepares them for adult life.

When my kids were little, I would go to the library and check out many books and read to them. I loved having the library as a free resource. I loved reading to my little children. It made us close, and we learned at the same time. It create a strong bond between us, and they still remember it.

It paid off as well. My first born is 92nd percentile in reading in her school district and 83rd in her state test. She is excelling in school. I am so proud.

You can even start reading to your child in the womb, at 30 weeks, and your infant will still reap benefits. This teaches your little one to begin to recognize speech patterns and start to develop language skills.

Here are the list of benefits of reading to your child age 0 to 12 years of age.

  • Reading to your infant teaches your baby phonics, and sparks language development. It also teaches them social skills and emotional awareness. It teaches baby about communication, how to listen, and begins their vocab awareness.
  • Toddlers: Jump starts their speech, and language development. It teaches them about the world around them. The first three years of child development are the most important. Reading to your toddler is very beneficial for their development. It may help them learn to communicate better, and have less tantrums!
  • Preschoolers: Reading to these little ones, expands their vocabulary, speech, teaches them to concentrate, and teaches them about the world around them. They feel close and secure to their caregiver who is reading to them. This intimacy helps them grow smarter. Reading to your preschooler sets a foundation for a positive attitude towards reading as they grow. When you read to your child, they will want to try to start reading on their own! This helps them get ready for school.
  • Reading to your school aged child. They will no doubt be taught these skills in school, but you can make it fun. This is beneficial for them. Reading helps them learn critical skills for making decisions, including coping mechanisms. They will need these skills in life later on! It helps them learn to concentrate, which is great for ADHD. My daughter was diagnosed with ADHD, but now she is excelling. Reading out loud to your child builds writing skills, and vocab skills. It teaches about emotions and creates a sense of empathy in your child. It helps your child better express their self verbally, which goes far in the real world when they are employed. It can spark new interests, and hobbies. It can help your child decide what to study in College, and be when they grow up. It helps your child learn right from wrong, because it builds thinking skills. Reading to your child builds lifelong readers.  Reading to your child is very beneficial. It gives your child a head start in life, and teaches them skills that benefit them in their adult life, such as making decisions and coping! Research proves reading to your child has long term benefits.

 

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Spelling Bee

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I’m proud to announce that my daughter will be in the spelling bee again this year. Last year she was second place out of her school. I don’t expect her to win, not because she isn’t a good speller, but because she inherited my shyness, she has stage fright. She is also young for being on stage in front of many people. I’m going to tell her to have fun, and not to sweat it.

I am not a good speller. She didn’t inherit this trait from me. I excelled at English in school though. I also liked Science as well. I think spell check has taught me to “forget how to spell”. Does anyone else feel like this? It’s kinda of like technology in certain ways can make us forget to do certain things, like memorize a phone number, which is good for our brains.

Research says that part of being a good speller is in our DNA. Spelling also uses different parts of our brain.